News

New Grant Opportunity at the National Endowment for the Arts

Office of Research & Analysis to offer grants to research value and impact of the arts

Last fall, when the NEA put forward a new strategic plan, the agency identified research as a mission-critical goal. Reflecting that new emphasis, the NEA’s Office of Research & Analysis is announcing the availability of grants to conduct research into the value and impact of the U.S. arts sector on the nation, whether on individuals or communities.

The NEA is interested in novel and significant research questions that will lead to greater public understanding of the contribution of the arts. Grantees may use either existing or newly established datasets to conduct their research, for example:

  • Longitudinal databases of Early Childhood and High School education (National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education)
  • American Community Survey (U.S. Census Bureau)
  • Current Population Survey and related supplements (U.S. Census Bureau)
  • American Time Use Survey (Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor)
  • Cultural Data Project (The Pew Charitable Trusts)

The resulting projects will help determine the usefulness of various datasets to arts-related research -- including those not previously used for that purpose. Through this grant opportunity, the NEA hopes to further expand the pool of researchers knowledgable about arts and culture datasets.

The NEA encourages applicants from diverse backgrounds, including those who have not specialized in arts-related research. Although applicants must be nonprofit organizations, they are encouraged to partner with for-profit entities, and/or use commercial and/or administrative datasets.

The NEA anticipates awarding up to 25 grants in the range of $10,000 to $30,000. The deadline for application is November 8, 2011 for projects that can begin as early as May 1, 2012. Application information and guidelines are available online.

About the National Endowment for the Arts

The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. To join the discussion on how art works, visit the NEA at www.arts.gov.