Grants

Outcomes

You will be asked to select the outcome that is most relevant to your project (note that all Arts Education applicants must choose the Learning outcome as their outcome). When making selections, you should identify the outcome(s) that reflect the results expected to be achieved by your project. If you receive a grant, you also will be asked to provide evidence of those results.

  1. Creation: The portfolio of American art is expanded.

    Support is available for projects to create art that meets the highest standards of excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. Through the creation of art, these projects are intended to replenish and rejuvenate America's enduring cultural legacy. Creation activities may include:

    • Commissioning, development, and producing new work.
    • Design competitions and design or cultural planning projects for new arts or cultural spaces or landscapes.
    • Workshops or residencies for artists where the primary purpose is to create new art.
    • Opportunities for writers and translators to create or refine their work.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art-making and design.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to provide evidence of the new art works created. If the project activities do not lead to the creation of completed works of art within the period of a grant, you may demonstrate progress toward the creation of art by describing the artists' participation and work accomplished by the end of the grant. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Creation.

  2. Engagement: Americans throughout the nation experience art.

    Support is available for projects that provide public engagement with artistic excellence across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should engage the public directly with the arts, providing Americans with new opportunities to have profound and meaningful arts experiences. Engagement activities may include:

    • Exhibitions, performances, concerts, and readings.
    • Film screenings.
    • Touring and outreach activities.
    • Restaging of repertory and master works of historical significance.
    • Art fairs and festivals.
    • Documentation, preservation, and conservation of art work.
    • Public programs that raise awareness of cultural heritage.
    • Broadcasts on television or radio; video games; mobile apps; live streaming, audio- and video-on-demand, podcasts, digital audio files, or other digital applications.
    • Design charrettes.
    • Publication, production, and promotion of digital, audio, mobile, or online publications; books; magazines; catalogues; and searchable information databases.
    • Services to artists and arts organizations.
    • Projects that extend the arts to underserved populations -- those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability.
    • Projects that employ innovative forms of art and design delivery.
    • Projects that enable the public to interact with electronic art.
    • Projects that bring artists to work directly with a community.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants' experiences as well as the composition of the participant group. If the nature of the project does not allow for the documentation of participants' experiences explicitly, you may document the composition of the participant group and numbers of participants and activities, and describe the activities used to engage the public with art. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Engagement.

  3. Learning: Americans of all ages acquire knowledge or skills in the arts.

    Support is available for projects that provide Americans of all ages with arts learning opportunities across a diverse spectrum of artistic disciplines and geographic locations. These projects should focus on the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts, thereby building public capacity for lifelong participation in the arts. Learning activities may include:

    • Lifelong learning activities for youth, adults, and intergenerational groups.
    • Standards-based arts education activities for pre-K-12 students.
    • Informal education programs, workshops, and demonstrations.
    • Mentorships and apprenticeship programs.
    • Professional development for artists, teaching artists, teachers, and other education providers.
    • Assessments and evaluations of arts learning.
    • Online courses or training.
    • Lectures and symposia.
    • Production, publication, and distribution of teachers'/facilitators’ guides.
    • Innovative practices in arts learning for Americans of all ages.
    • Engagement with living artists.

    You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. You will need to describe the participants' learning, the composition of the participant group, and the numbers of participants and activities, as well as the activities used to facilitate the acquisition of knowledge or skills in the arts. If you receive support through the Arts Education discipline for a standards-based project, you will be required to report on additional measurable results, including identifying specific learning outcomes, describing the assessment method, and reporting on the number of participants who demonstrated learning. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Learning. In addition to a Final Descriptive Report and Federal Financial Report, Arts Education grantees who apply for a Direct Learning Grant will be required to describe the methods used to assess learning, and they will be required to submit any tools used to assess learning with their Final Report.

  4. Livability: American communities are strengthened through the arts.

    Support is available for projects that incorporate the arts and design into strategies to improve the livability of communities. Livability consists of a variety of factors that contribute to the quality of life in a community such as ample opportunities for social, civic, and cultural engagement; public safety; affordable housing and ease of transportation; and an aesthetically pleasing environment. The arts can enhance livability by providing new avenues for expression and creativity. Arts- and design-related Livability activities may include:

    • The development of plans for cultural and/or creative sector growth.
    • The enhancement of public spaces through design or new art works.
    • Arts or design activities that are intended to foster community interaction in public spaces.
    • Activities that contribute to community identity and sense of place.
    • The inclusion of artists, designers, and/or arts organizations in civic engagement activities and plans and processes to improve community livability and enhance the unique characteristics of a community.
    • Innovative community-based partnerships that integrate the arts with livability efforts.

    Please note that certain types of Livability activities will require applicants to provide information in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and/or the National Historic Preservation Act. See here for more information.

    The anticipated long-term results for Livability projects are measurable community benefits, such as growth in overall levels of social and civic engagement; new avenues for expression and creativity; design-focused changes in policies, laws, and/or regulations; job and/or revenue growth; or positive changes in migration patterns. You will be asked to address the anticipated results in your application. If you receive a grant, you will be asked to provide evidence of those results at the end of your project. Given the nature of Livability projects, benefits are likely to emerge over time and may not be fully measureable during the period of a grant. You will need to provide evidence of progress toward achieving improved livability as appropriate to the project. Reporting requirements for Livability are different from -- and more extensive than -- the reporting requirements for the other outcomes. Before applying, please review the reporting requirements for Livability.