Art Works Blog

Already feeling worn out by the holiday season even though Thanksgiving is still a few days away? Not to worry--from Koko Taylor to Honeyboy Edwards to Whistlin' Alex Moore, we have more than a few NEA National Heritage Fellows and master blues musicians to help get your mojo going! Here's...
"Books, you know, they’re not just commodities. The profit motive often is in conflict with the aims of art. We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often...
While we're grateful for artists every month, we're particularly thankful in this month when we take time off from "real life" to count our blessings large and small. In today's post NEA staffers reflect on some artists to whom they'd like to give a big old THANK YOU! Don...
New NEA Music and Opera Director Ann Meier Baker pens an open letter to the piano teacher who taught her the importance of failure.
Literary translator Johanna Warren talks about the relationship between the translator and the author whose work is being translated.
Edwidge Danticat muses on writing and knowing the self.
At 45 years old, Earl Mills was married with five children, owned his own home, and had worked steadily through the years. Yet he had a secret that few others knew: he could not read. This is unfortunately not an unusual circumstance: according to the U.S. Department of Education, 32 million U.S...
"Expressing myself, I've found, is necessary for my survival." —Larry McNeil I nnovation in photography is nothing new: the invention of the camera itself was a technological marvel. So advances in the art form are almost less surprising than artists who buck the trend, and...
Carol Morgan, deputy director for Education at ArtsConnection, and Jennifer Stengel-Mohr of New York’s Queens College present context for their presentation during the next NEA Task Force webinar which will focus on their research on the relationship between arts education and English language learners.
In 2005, with the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq still relatively fresh in the papers, Matt Mitchell felt compelled to somehow do his part. He had worked for years as an illustrator, but turned now to portraiture, with the idea of capturing the personal and complex experience of return. He set out to...

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